Unexpectedly

Glenn Reynolds (aka Instapundit) has been keeping track of a number of unexpected things:

Jobless Claims Unexpectedly Rise; Inflation Pressure Grows

U.S. Durable Goods Orders Unexpectedly Fell In February

U.S. New-Home Sales Unexpectedly Fall to Lowest on Record

New claims for unemployment aid rise more than expected

Joblessness rose unexpectedly. Again.

And the list goes on. You’ll notice a common thread through these: they all deal with financial issues, jobs, homes and stuff we buy. One would think that after a few “unexpected” changes, that the people with expectations might change them. That would be true if the people with expectations were not wishing and hoping so very, very hard that the Keynesian economic principles would work this time around. Unfortunately for them–and for all of us–the system is broken.

Why have I been thinking and writing so much about financial matters? Let me put it very simply. The best time to fix many of the systemic issues with our economy was back when the underlying legislation was passed into law. The next best time to fix it is now. I know that some believe we have already gone to far and are unable to recover from our country’s descent into the abyss of default and devaluation. Since I am not a trained economist, I do not not know. However, I strive to be an optimist.

My optimism is grounded in realism. Realism tells me that “unexpected” needs to go the way of the dodo bird. Until we admit how much trouble we are in, we will not be of the mind to change the things that got us there.

As a 12-stepper might put it: “Admitting I have a problem is the first step.”